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Brown Bear
Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Spring cubs, not at all unlike their human counterparts, are always getting into trouble; and, like humans, each have their own, unique personality. During their first year, young bears are referred to as spring cubs. The following year they’re called yearlings. After that, they’re known as two-year-olds, three-years-olds, etc. Cubs typically stay with their mothers through their yearling phase being forced to strike out on their own. Three- and four-year-olds are occasionally observed under their mother’s watchful eye.

Edition of 500
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© WELDON LEE/All Rights Reserved
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Bears
Brown Bear<br />
Lake Clark National Park, Alaska<br />
<br />
Spring cubs, not at all unlike their human counterparts, are always getting into trouble; and, like humans, each have their own, unique personality. During their first year, young bears are referred to as spring cubs. The following year they’re called yearlings. After that, they’re known as two-year-olds, three-years-olds, etc. Cubs typically stay with their mothers through their yearling phase being forced to strike out on their own. Three- and four-year-olds are occasionally observed under their mother’s watchful eye.<br />
<br />
Edition of 500